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  1. Marmalade Brownies Recipe

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    Marmalade Brownies Recipe

    The best thing about making your own marmalade is that you can use it for other baking recipes and the flavour is going to be so much better than a basic supermarket marmalade.

    This simple brownie recipe is delicious with very chunky bitter seville orange marmalade, but you can easily use any other type. And you know what? I'm not going to judge you if you use a shop bought one either!

    Marmalade Brownie Recipe

    200g dark chocolate 

    175g unsalted butter

    325g caster sugar

    130g plain flour

    3 eggs

    3 table spoons of seville orange marmalade

    icing sugar to decorate

    33x23x5cm baking tray lined with greaseproof paper

    Makes about 12 portions

    Here is what to do:

    1. Preheat your oven to 170C (325F) Gas 3. 

    2. Break your chocolate into small pieces and place it with butter in a heatproof bowl melt it slowly in microwave, 20 seconds at a time and stiring until completely melted.

    3. Add the sugar stirring well until incorporated.

    4. Add the flour and stir well.

    5. Stir in the eggs and mix until thick and smooth.   

    6. Add the marmalade and stir the mixture carefully.

    7.Spoon the mixture into the prepared baking tray and bake in the preheated oven for about 30-35 minutes or until flaky on the top but still soft in the centre. 

    8. Leave to cool in the tin on a wire rack, before dusting with icing sugar to decorate.

    Hope you enjoy this recipe 

    Happy Baking

    Magdalena

    OTHER BROWNIE RECIPES YOU MIGHT LIKE TO TRY

    Simple Brownie Recipe >>

    Oatmeal Brownie Recipe >>

  2. Easy Chocolate Brownie Recipe

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    Easy Brownie Recipe

    This easy chocolate brownie recipe is perfect for when you have spare 20 minutes or so and want to make a desert really quickly.

    The recipe is also great to make with children - you can't over mix it and you don't even need electric whisk to mix everything together. I often bake this recipe to serve at my bread baking workshops and since a lot of people asked me for the recipe, I've decided to share it here.

  3. Digestive Biscuits Truffle Recipe

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    How to make chocolate truffles with digestive biscuits

    These chocolate treats were popular in British schools home economics or cooking classes towards the mid to end 20 century. There were cheaper versions of the grown-up chocolate truffles and were easy for children to make during the school class. I’m assuming that this recipe was developed after the second world war when real chocolate was still rationed, expensive and very difficult to come by.

    While a lot of war time food rationing shopped after the end of the war a lot of food items continued to be rationed well until the 1950s. Chocolate was rationed until 5th of February 1953 and sugar until September 1953.

    That is why this recipe originally uses only drinking chocolate as the only source of chocolate, and the sugar element comes from condensed milk. Fresh cream, which is what chocolatiers use mostly to create chocolate truffles these days, was far too expensive and not everyone had a fridge to keep it in. Since digestive biscuits were invented around 1839 by two Scottish doctors, it’s likely that this school truffle recipe is originally Scottish too.

    Digestive biscuits were invented to help to aid digestion, and they are probably a a little bit healthier than other types of biscuit. They would also be cheap to buy and easy to crumble into the recipe mix.

    I’m also guessing that the original recipe wouldn’t include butter, as it would add to the cost of the recipe. You can easily leave it out, if you like, just adjust the amount of the biscuits (you will need more than stated in the recipe or omit the desiccated coconut to even out the wet/dry ingredients).

    The desiccated coconut is also a later addition, making the recipe extra yummy, but of course adding to the cost.

    If you want to make this recipe on a budget, you only need three ingredients — tin of condensed milk, pack of digestive biscuits and cocoa powder.

    I would suggest using cocoa powder instead of the drinking chocolate powder (the original recipe has this, because of the cost). The cocoa powder will, of course, give you stronger chocolate flavour, and these days it’s probably not more expensive than a good drinking cocoa powder.

    Before you start making this chocolate truffle recipe, I have to warn you, that these school truffles are very sweet and totally addictive. Once you make them, you’ll know!

    So, how do you make truffles with digestive biscuits? Here is how:

    Truffles made from digestive biscuits - ingredients

    Large pack of plain digestive biscuits (about 400g)

    1 tin of condensed milk

    125 g of unsalted butter

    2-4 tablespoon of cocoa powder or drinking chocolate

    125g desiccated sweetened coconut

    Topping

    Chocolate sprinkles, desiccated coconut or cocoa powder

    Melt the butter first and leave to cool down a bit. Break and crush the digestive biscuits. The best way to do this is to place all the biscuits in a large ziplock bag and use a rolling pin to crush them.  Mix all the dry ingredients in a large bowl, add the condensed milk and butter.

    Mix gently until you have a good consistency. Scoop out a heaped teaspoon of the mixture and roll in cocoa powder or a topping of your choice. Leave to set in a fridge for a couple of hours and enjoy!

    These school truffles are best enjoyed within a week of making, and you can store them in a fridge in an airtight container.

    Now, that you’ve made these chocolate truffles with digestive biscuits, what do you think? Do let me know in the comments below and if you would like to make some more chocolate truffle recipes.

    Until the next time, happy chocolate making!

    Magdalena

     

    MORE TRADITIONAL RECIPES & CHOCOLATE TREATS

    Chocolate Truffle Making Tips >>

    Chocolate & Rum Truffle Recipe >>

    Chocolate Rum & Cake Crumbs Truffles Recipe >>

    Christmas Chocolate Truffles >>

    Chocolate Truffles Recipe with Biscuits Crumbs

  4. The Ultimate Guide to Ruby Chocolate

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    What is Ruby chocolate_

    By now, I’m sure you have heard about so called ruby chocolate. It’s been widely talked about topic in the chocolate world and chocolatiers around the world are using this chocolate to create amazing chocolate treats. So, what’s so special about this type of chocolate? How was this chocolate discovered?

    So, let’s start at the beginning.

    Ruby chocolate was created by a leading chocolate brand, Barry Callebaut and introduced to the world in 2017. Ruby chocolate wasn’t just discovered, it was invented and carefully researched by a team of chocolate experts at Barry Callebaut over the last ten years prior to the launch. The ruby chocolate was registered as a patent in 2009. As you would have expected, the actual recipe is a secret, but the flavour and colour of the chocolate comes directly from the special cross bread ruby cocoa beans which were cultivated in the Ivory Coast, Equador and Brazil.

  5. Top 10 cocoa producing countries

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    Top 10 chocolate producing countries

    Chocolate is enjoyed throughout the world and the latest figures state that over 4.4 million tonnes of cocoa is produced each year.

    However, chocolate itself, is made from cocoa beans which grow on cacao trees. These are only found in a narrow band either side of the Equator and require hot, and rainy humid conditions to bear fruit. Cacao trees were first cultivated in Central America around 1,500 BC, but today, four of the five top cocoa producing nations are in West Africa.

    The top ten cocoa producing countries are spread out across four continents, but which nations produce the most cocoa? (Figures from the UN Food and Agriculture).

  6. Is chocolate gluten free?

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    Is chocolate gluten free

    Is chocolate gluten free?

    That’s a question we’re often asked in a spare moment during our chocolate making workshops or when people book our fun chocolate making hen parties. When I got asked for the first time I had to really think, because since I work with 'proper' chocolate I don't even think about alergies. It's just chocolate, you know...nothing else! I never really promoted my chocolate as gluten free, suitable for vegetarians and vegans or that it can be made completely lactose free.

    It's just a normal chocolate, right...everybody knows that! Well, it turns out that not everyone does and because 99% of mass produced chocolate products contain all sorts of things, that just shouldn't be there, understandably people ask, whether my chocolate is gluten free or not.

  7. How to make chocolate at home using cocoa nibs

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    Organic raw cocoa nibs

    People often ask me when they come to my chocolate workshops, whether we will be making chocolate from scratch. This depends on the course, but we usually start with the chocolate making from chocolate coverture. There is still a lot of involved when you get to that stage – careful melting, chocolate tempering, flavouring and moulding.

    So in most cases, we don’t start with making chocolate from the real beginning, but if you fancied making chocolate at home, here is how to do it! This recipe is suitable for vegetarians and vegan diets and it's also gluten free and dairy free (if you don't use powdered milk to make milk chocolate, or use coconut milk powder instead). 

  8. Is cocoa a fruit?

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    Is cocoa a fruit?

    When we’re running our various chocolate making courses we often  get asked lots of questions from enthusiastic chocolate makers about every aspect of the chocolate making process. And, of course, it’s a pleasure to share our knowledge with so many keen and eager course attendees and chocolatiers to be. Sometimes the questions are technical and detailed– such as those about the tempering and the chocolate crystallisation process. Others are more general, but equally practical, like when do we get to eat it all?