Welcome to Cocoa & Heart blog!

 RSS Feed

Category: Chocolate & Sweets Facts & History

  1. What is white chocolate made of ?

    Posted on

    What is White Chocolate made of_

    As Chocolatiers, we’re used to being asked all manner of questions about our favourite type of confectionary in all its different shapes and forms. But one of the most asked questions concerns colour. And then it’s usually closely followed up with another question about content. Guessed it yet? Yes, people often ask us: 'What is white chocolate made of?'

    First shown 1961, Nestle’s fair faced, whiter than white Milky Bar Kid was a familiar face on our tv screens for over two decades. Riding into the Wild West, he sang of ‘the creamiest milk, the whitest bars, that’s the goodness that’s in milky bars.’ Many of us grew up with the catchphrase ‘the milky bars are on me’ ringing in our ears.

  2. Chocolates in the 1980s

    Posted on

    Chocolates in the 1980s

    The 1980s was the decade that I grew up – from starting my teenage years at secondary school in the East Midlands to ending up working in the city – of London.  It was the Thatcherite era – of selling off big public assets, like state utilities (selling out to some people). More people started to buy shares as privatisation took hold and council house owners were suddenly able to buy their own homes.

    What’s this got to do with chocolates I hear you ask. Well, everything. As an impressionable teenager, in my oversized school uniform and undone tie, I was as keen to follow the mood of the nation and earn a quick buck for myself as the next city gent in his red braces and smart pin stripe suit.

  3. How to taste chocolate

    Posted on

    How to taste chocolate like an expert

    The title of this blog post might sound a bit strange. I mean how complicated or difficult could it be to taste chocolate? You just munch on it, and that it! About 25 years ago I would have thought the same, but after working with chocolate for the last two decades, I will let you on a secret!

    Chocolate has so many subtle flavours, and the taste develops as you taste it, and it certainly matters how you ‘chomp’ on it! So, let me share with you how to taste chocolate like an expert.

  4. What temperature does chocolate melt at?

    Posted on

    What temperature does chocolate melt at?

    Generally speaking chocolate starts to melt from 30 to 32 C, just a little bit lower than your body temperature (that’s why chocolate tastes so good, when you melt it on your tonque!). But the exact melting temperature depends on the content of the chocolate you are melting (or try not to melt!).

    Before we go into the scientific explanation of chocolate melting, what you probably want to remember is that white chocolate melts at the lowest temperature, milk chocolate somewhere in the middle, whereas dark chocolate takes the longest to melt.

  5. How many seeds are there in a cocoa pod?

    Posted on

    how many seeds are there in a cocoa pod

    Chocolate – the nectar of the gods in Latin – is a scare resource. Prices are increasing and the size of the bar itself is getting smaller. Last Christmas, Mondelez, the makers of Toblerone reduced the number of distinctive triangles in its chocolate bars in order to keep the price the same. For many consumers, it simply wasn’t the same.

    I always knew that one need quite a lot of cocoa pods to end up with one chocolate bar, but I never actually look into this properly. Until last week, when one of our chocolate courses students ask a relatively innocent question: 'How many seeds are there in a cocoa pod?'

  6. History of Chocolate Timeline

    Posted on

    Cocoa Beans - chocolate timeline

    Here at Cocoa and Heart, we’re fascinated by all things chocolate. And chocolate itself and how it was first cultivated in Central America as a bitter drink and then brought over to Europe and gradually developed into a chocolate bar for eating, has a fascinating history all of its own. Here are some of the key dates in the History of Chocolate Timeline.

    1,500 BC: The people of Central America begin to drink chocolate. The cacao tree may have been cultivated earlier than people first thought. Linguistic links to the words cacao and chocolate can be traced back to the Olmec peoples which pre-dates Maya and Atzec civilisation by several hundred years.

    900 AD: Maya Civilisation: Pottery cups found in the tombs of Maya nobility contain symbols for cacoa and images for its preparation.