Welcome to Cocoa & Heart blog!

The Ultimate List of Chocolate Bars

Posted on

0 Comments

Cocoa & Heart Chocolate Bars

This week we've decided to challenge ourself to a chocolate bar knowledge quiz. We didn't score badly at all, but the problem is that when you spend your days educating people in eating good quality chocolate, you really don't eat that many mainstream chocolate bars. So, we thought we should really find out more about traditional chocolate bars. Whilst I still prefer my own handmade chocolate bars on most days, there is a time and place when only Twix will do! Each week, we are challenging ourself to find out more about popular chocolate bars, bring you their rich history and describe the taste too. 

We'll update this blog post with more information, photos and history from the wonderful chocolate world!

Magdalena & Nick

Well known UK chocolate bars

Most popular chocolate bars

KitKat and KitKat Chunky

What chocolate covered wafer bar was originally called Rowntree's Chocolate Crisp when it was first introduced in 1935? No idea. OK, another clue. It has two or four individual finger bars, each made up of three layers and each coated by layers of usually milk chocolate. Oh and it comes wrapped in silver foil. Yes, Kit Kat, of course! 
 
Sold in a blue wrapper during the second world war, the familiar red packaging came into being in 1947. Early advertising proclaimed Kit Kat as 'the biggest little meal' and something to enjoy with a cup of tea. The famous advertising slogan 'Have a break; have a Kit Kat' dates from the late 1950s. This theme was the plot of a popular TV ad from the late 1980s where a zoo photographer takes a break to have a Kit Kat and misses seeing pandas performing a dance routine.
 
Kit Kat Chunky hit the shelves in 1999 and you may have also tasted Kit Kat Orange. A more recent variety features ruby cocoa beans and comes in a pink wrapper. In Japan, Nestle have introduced over 200 variations alone since 2000 such as matcha and soy sauce.
Back in the UK, you can bet that up and down the country  there are thousands of workers settling back for a cuppa and breaking into a Kit Kat whatever its flavour.


Cadbury Dairy Milk Caramel

Aero and Aero Mint
Fudge

Mars Bar

'A Mars a day helps you work, rest and play'. That was the hook line of the TV ad for Mars in the 1970's and 1980's. It featured an array of bronzed beached torsos enjoying the sun while and playing beach volleyball and then splashing in the sea to go surfing. More like California than Cromer. As a recipe for keeping the doctor away, it's more appealing than eating an apple - but probably a calling card for a visit to the dentist.  And yet, ironically, the Uk version of the Mars Bar has always been more popular than its American equivalent. It's a case of one name, two people and two recipes. 
 
A recipe for success in the UK, but not necessarily across the Pond. So what are the differences between the two bars and why are the stars, or should that be planets, not aligned in the same confectionary solar system?
 
The Mars bar we eat in the UK is made with milk, caramel, chocolate and nougat. Whereas, for consumers in the US, the ingredients don't include caramel which is replaced by toasted almonds and the nougat is covered in milk chocolate. In the US, the Mars bar is often compared to Snickers and the UK version is more akin to Milky Way, although more substantial and filling in texture. 
 
'Like Father, Like Son' goes the popular saying. But what happens in a business when the Father and Son don't get on? In the case of the Mars family, the son moves to the UK, Slough to be precise, and makes his own chocolate bar, based initially on his father's Milky Way creation, first invented a decade earlier in the 1920's.  It's a good job Sir John Betjeman's friendly bombs didn't fall on Slough, because Mars bar production has continued interrupted there since 1932, enjoyed by millions, although probably not at the beach.
 
In the heady world of nostalgia everything seems bigger and better. I'll leave others to decide if Mars tastes better than before (the company claims to have reduced the level of saturated fats without changing the taste). But if you remember the Mars bar you ate as a kid as bigger, then your memory is definitely not deceiving you. Between 2008 and 2013, the company, which is still family owned, reduced its size by 20%. This didn't affect it's share of the market and the distinctive black wrapper and red encased font is as popular now as when Frank C Mars gave the bar the family name nearly eighty years ago.

Toblerone

Ask anyone what the Swiss are famous for, and the chances are that chocolate is going to be right up there with making cuckoo clocks, banks, mountains and being neutral. Lindt's development of the conching process, revolutionised the making of chocolate truffles and solid milk chocolate came about through Nestle's ground breaking production of condensed milk 
 
Probably the most famous Swiss confectionery bar is Toblerone. Its iconic series of joined up triangular shapes neatly combines the country's expertise in making exquisite chocolate and love of climbing alpine peaks. First made in 1908 and still produced in the Swiss capital of Bern, we have Theodor Tobler and his cousin Emil Baumann to thank for this distinctive towering addition to the chocolate landscape. 
 
I'm not sure if it was ever going to be called the Baumann bar, but coated in honey and almond nougat, Toblerone still stands out in both size and shape. In fact, the name appears to be a clever combination of Tobler's surname with the Italian word torrone - which describes a southern european nougat confection made from honey, sugar and eggs with toasted almonds
 
Opening of the triangular pieces is an art in itself. It can be as hard as break open as one of the legendary Swiss vaults but once cracked the rewards as well worth it. The uncompromising milk chocolate exterior gives way to a soft and sweet centre which literally does melt in the mouth - like a glacier ice patch in summer. 
 
The Swiss may have a reputation for neutrality but the decision to change the content of Toblerone left very few people on the fence.
In 2016 two peaks were removed and larger gaps were introduced between each peak, in two of the bars in the United Kingdom, to cut the weight of the bars and reduce costs, while retaining the same package size. A case of global warming perhaps or erosion, perhaps? Or just the usual measure to respond to rising costs? Either way, there was an avalanche of protest.
 
Despite changes in its size, a Toblerone is still likely to stand and stick out of any children's Christmas chocolate stocking.

Cadbury Dairy Milk Chocolate Bar 

Rolo

Cadbury Flake

Cadbury Double Decker

Wispa Mint
Double Decker
Time Out Orange

Twix

Are you be-twixted? It's not actually, (to my knowledge) a tag line for advertising Twix chocolate bar, but perhaps it should be! With a biscuit base coated with caramel and typically milk chocolate, Twix first appeared in the UK in 1967. In many European countries it went under the name Raider for many years. In the US, where it was launched in the late 1970's, there have been many additional flavours, such as Peanut Butter.  Twix Java with coffee flavoured caramel, expresso and milk chocolate sounds appealing with a caffeine infusion of any sort.  Across the globe, Twix has also featured milk dark and white chocolate versions as well as orange. There's even been a Twix with mint flavoured caramel.

It's definitely one of my favourites, perhaps because of the extra layer of chocolate between the biscuit and the caramel that gives Twix it's satisfying feel good taste and makes the chewing all the more rewarding. Another sign that Twix is enjoyed the world over, comes from cultural references to the bar in episodes of Seinfeld and most recently, Orange is the New Black. 
 
Get your fix and don't be be-twixted!


Galaxy
Bournville
Topic

Caramac
Wonka

Mr Big 
Wispa

Cadbury Bournville Dark
Picnic
Toblerone
Time Out Bar
Thorntons Orange Jazz
Thorntons Fudge Blues

Cadbury Dairy Milk Freddo Bar
Nuts About Caramel 

Snickers

Galaxy Ripple
Kinder Bueno 

Kinder Bueno White
Milky Lunch
Nuts About Caramel Double Chocolate
Milky Bar
Milky Way Crispy Rolls
Wispa Gold
Peppermint Cream

 

Fry’s Turkish Delight

It's not just a delight, it's Fry's Turkish Delight. Not only that 'it's Full of Eastern Promise' or so the tv advert goes. Whatever the individual claims, Fry's can truly claim to have a long and rich chocolate history, pioneering several ground breaking and cocoa grinding techniques along the way. 
Founded by Joseph Fry, a Quaker, in the mid 18th century, the Bristol based, the company made the first solid chocolate bar in 1847. Not long after came the first filled chocolate sweet in 1853 and then in 1866, Fry's Chocolate Cream launched mass produced chocolate bars into the British market. Confectionary shelves and shops the world over have never been quite the same again. Fry's Turkish Bar (later renamed Turkish Delight) first appeared in 1914 making it one of the oldest chocolate bars to be in continuous production.
 
The year 1914, of course, marked the start of the First World War, during which Britain was at war with the Turkish Ottoman Empire. I wonder how that went down with the troops? I've no idea if Lawrence of Arabia enjoyed a bite of Turkish Delight or two in his tent in the middle of the Arabian desert during his war time campaigns. Fry's merged with Cadbury's in 1919 but the name has continued to appear on bars ever since and the current wrapper is a shade of pink and purple in colour in the UK with a light yellow star above the name. The actual Turkish Delight is rose tinted surrounded by milk chocolate. A perennial favourite. And guaranteed to get a reaction from children, one way or another, tasting the sticky glucose syrup mixture inside for the first time.


Crunch
Yorkie Nut
Drifter

Galaxy Caramel Double Chocolate

Galaxy Excellence Dark
Dubble

Perhaps less known chocolate bars
Daim – milk chocolate with a crunchy almond caramel centre

Nobble
Maverick

Dairy Milk Orange
Crunch White
Whole Nut
Chocolate Cream

Milk Chocolate Honeycomb
Caramel Whip

Bounty

A taste of paradise? Yes, we're talking about Bounty. Remember the tv advert asking if you are a Bounty Hunter?
Moist tender coconut covered in rich dark chocolate. But it wasn't always that way.
Initially, when Bounty was first introduced in 1951, it was only available in milk chocolate. The milk chocolate bar comes in a coral blue wrapper, while dark chocolate is in a red wrapper. Made by Mars, over the years, there seem to have been limited editions featuring other tropical ingredients. Such as cherry, in Australia, mango in parts of Europe and even pineapple in Russia. 
Remember the scene in the tv comedy Gavin & Stacey when Ness is handing out mini chocolate bars to started guests as Christmas presents? 'Bad luck you got the Bounty!' as if it's the booby prize. 
TV chef Nigella Lawson probably wouldn't think so because she included a recipe for a deep fried  Bounty bar in one of her cook books. I have to confess that Bounty (dark chocolate) is one of my favourites. I can chew away on the strands of coconut for ages extracting every ounce of moisture from a single strand. So Ness can give me a Bounty Bar any time and not just on Christmas day!


Aztec 2000 

Cadbury Star Bar

Fry’s Chocolate Cream

Aero Snow
Excellence Milk
KitKat Chunky Orange
Yorkie Honeycomb

Galaxy Caramel
Echo
Chomp
Aero Chunky
Aero Cappuccino
SnowFlake
Snickers
Galaxy 

Fruit & Nut 

Crunchie Explosion 
Chocolate Orange Bar
Bitz Mint
Aero Honeycomb
Toffee Crisps
Fuse
Cadbury Curly Wurly
Bounty Milk

Wispa 
Twix

Twix White
Cadbury Dairy Milk Twirl
Time Out
Milky Way

Crunchie
Yorkie original

Yorkie Raisin & Biscuit
Boost
Nestle Lion Peanut Bar

Nestle Lion Bar

Chocolate Bars from USA popular in UK

Nestle Baby Ruth Candy Bar – milk chocolate with peanuts and caramel

Nestle Butterfinger Candy Bar – milk chocolate with peanut butter

Hershey’s Cookie & Cream

Hershey’s Creamy Milk Chocolate

Hershey’s Cookies & Chocolate

Reeses Cups

Add a comment:

Leave a comment:

Comments

Add a comment